Robin's Blog

Archive for the ‘Linux’ Category

Automatic PDF calendar generation with pcal

During the Nepal earthquake response project I worked on, we were gradually getting access to historical mobile phone data for use in our analyses. I wanted to keep track of which days of data we had got access to, and which ones we were still waiting for. I wrote a simple script to print out […]

Blogroll

I really enjoy reading blogs. That seems to be a slightly outdated view, as many people have moved over to using Twitter exclusively, but I like being able to follow everything that a specific person writes, and seeing mostly long-form articles rather than off-the-cuff comments. Back in the day, when blogs were really popular, every […]

Reminder about cross-platform case-sensitivity differences

This is just a very brief reminder about something you might run into when you’re trying to get your code to work on multiple platforms – in this case, OS X, Linux and Windows. Basically: file names/paths are case-sensitive on Linux, but not on OS X or Windows. Therefore, you could have some Python code […]

How to: Log electricity usage from a CurrentCost EnviR – Part 1

After borrowing a CurrentCost electricity usage meter from my local library (if you’re in the area, then Eastleigh library will loan you one for free!), I decided to buy one, as I’d found it very useful in trying to reduce my electricity usage. The benefit of buying one as opposed to borrowing one was that […]

How to: Solve GDAL error ‘An error occurred while writing a dirty block’

When running GDAL on my university’s supercomputer yesterday I got the following error: ERROR 1: Landsat_Soton.tif, band 1: An error occured while writing a dirty block This post is really just to remind me how to solve this error – I imagine the error may have a multitude of possible causes. In my case though, […]

Reading data from instruments via RS-232 simply in Linux

As part of my research I do a fair amount of data collection in the field. Some of the instruments I use are very modern and connect to a computer via USB, interacting with custom-written client software which allows such luxuries as timed logging, triggered logging and local calibration. However, a number of the instruments […]