Robin's Blog

Archive for the ‘Remote Sensing’ Category

What’s new in Py6S

The last few months have seen a flurry of activity in Py6S – probably caused by procrastinating from working on my PhD thesis! Anyway, I thought it was about time that I summarised the various updates and new features which have been released, and gave a few more details on how to use them. These […]

How to: Fix weird ENVI startup file issues

This post is more a note to myself than anything else – but it might prove useful for someone sometime. In the dim and distant mists of time, I set up a startup file for ENVI which automatically loaded a specific image every time you opened ENVI. I have no idea why I did that […]

Software choices in remote sensing

I recently read the article Don’t be a technical masochist on John D. Cook’s blog, and it struck a chord with me about the way that I see people choosing software and programming tools in my field. John states “Sometimes tech choices are that easy: if something is too hard, stop doing it. A great […]

Py6S now has Continuous Integration & better tests

As a Fellow of the Software Sustainability Institute I’m always trying to make my software more sustainable – and one element of this is ensuring that my software works correctly. Although crashes might annoy users (which generally isn’t a good plan if you want your software to be well-used), a far worse problem is your […]

Encouraging citation of software – introducing CITATION files

Summary: Put a plaintext file named CITATION in the root directory of your code, and put information in it about how to cite your software. Go on, do it now – it’ll only take two minutes! Software is very important in science – but good software takes time and effort that could be used to do […]

van Heuklon Ozone model implementation in Python

As part of my PhD I wanted to use a simple model which would give me an estimation of the atmospheric ozone amount given a location and time of year. A simple model to do this was created by van Heuklon in 1979, and was described in a delightfully simple paper (unfortunately not freely available […]