Robin's Blog

Archive for the ‘Python’ Category

How to: rescue lost code from a Jupyter/IPython notebook

Jupyter (formerly known as IPython) notebooks are great – but have you ever accidentally deleted a cell that contained a really important function that you want to keep? Well, this post might help you get it back. So, imagine you have a notebook with the following code: and then you accidentally delete the top cell, with […]

Previously Unpublicised Code: RPiNDVI

Another instalment in my Previously Unpublicised Code series…this time RPiNDVI, my code for displaying live NDVI images from the Raspberry Pi NoIR camera. It isn’t perfect, and it isn’t finished – but it does the job as a proof-of-concept. If you point the camera out of your window you should see high NDVI values (white) […]

How to: Get Sublime Text style editing in the IPython/Jupyter notebook

So, I really like the Jupyter notebook (formerly known as the IPython notebook), but I often find myself missing the ‘fancy’ features that ‘proper’ editors have. I particularly miss the amazing multiple cursor functionality of editors like Sublime Text and Atom. I’ve known for a while that you can edit a cell in your default […]

Ten Little IDL programs in Python

I recently saw Michael Galloy’s post at http://michaelgalloy.com/2016/02/18/ten-little-idl-programs.html, showing some short (less than ten lines long) programs in IDL. I used to do a lot of programming in IDL, but have switched almost all of my work to Python now – and was intrigued to see what the code looked like in Python. I can’t […]

Programming link clearance 2015: Python edition

I have a Coding bookmarks folder which is stuffed full of loads of interesting articles that I’ve never shared with anyone because they don’t really fit into any of my posts. So, taking an idea from The Old New Thing, I’m going to run a few ‘Link Clearance’ posts. This is the Python-focused one (there will be […]

Hacking the Worcester Wave thermostat in Python – Part 3

So, last time we worked out how communications were encrypted and managed to read the current status of the heating system (whether the boiler is on or not, the current temperature, and so on). That’s great – but it’d be even better if we could actually control the thermostat from Python: set the temperature, change […]